Germans into nazis by peter fritzsche

In this dramatically plotted book, organized around crucial turning points in, andPeter Fritzsche explains why the Nazis were so popular and what was behind the political choice made by the German people.

Germans into Nazis

This book is gracefully written, provides provocative challenges for more extensive reinterpretations, and is worthy reading for all students of Nazi Germany. Within a generation, Germans had grown increasingly self-reliant and sovereign, while intensely nationalistic and chauvinistic.

The Nazis travelled to thousands of towns and cities, speaking directly to the German people and uniting rather than dividing them. I know plenty of Germans.

Germans into Nazis, by Peter Fritzsche (1998)

In this dramatically plotted book, organized around crucial turning points in, andPeter Fritzsche explains why the Nazis were so popularand what was behind the political choice made by the German people.

The new republic incorporated a political regime that Germans could stand against together much as they stood together in August to fight for a unified Germany. The book provides a combination of scholarly research and literary skill, a combination too rare in academic works. Neither, it seems, do many Americans.

This radical rebelliousness destroyed old authoritarian structures as much as it attacked liberal principles. The new civic engagement never went away. He explains that the war broke apart old notions of what it meant to be German.

The popular mobilization brought people together for the first time in a sense of common purpose and resulted in an unprecedented level of civic engagement — the Volksgemeinschaft, the community working as one. They do not Germans into nazis by peter fritzsche two heads.

According to Fritzsche, many postwar parties opposed these; the Nazis were nothing new in this respect. The author argues that Nazism was part of a larger process of democratization and political invigoration. The twenty-year period beginning in was characterized by the steady advance of a broad populist revolution that was animated by war, drew strength from the Revolution ofmenaced the WeimarRepublic, and finally culminated in the rise of the Nazis.

They had recast the nation, but put it on the road to war and genocide. Competing parties did not provide such an umbrella approach to politics—Socialists were internationalists, nationalists were conservative, and Catholics repelled Protestants.

Contemporary Review Review Historians examining nations over periods of time have somehow to find a balance between what is inherent in a people and what is not, in order to attempt explanations of national attitudes and conduct. If we want to understand the real role of WW1 in the rise of Nazism, we should start not in but inand look at the way it made the Germans feel one people, even though they had been that in theory for over 40 years.

His thought-provoking book attempts to answer the question by casting aside the conventional e Why did the Germans usher Hitler into power in ? Why did a civilized Central European power suddenly and swiftly descend into moral depths? Hindenburg represented the war-soldier culture and national unity that enabled Germans to reimagine the nation.

The twenty-year period beginning in was characterized by the steady advance of a broad populist revolution that was animated by war, drew strength from the Revolution ofmenaced the Weimar Republic, and finally culminated in the rise of the Nazis.

The twenty-year period beginning in was characterized by the steady advance of a broad populist revolution that was animated by war, drew strength from the Revolution ofmenaced the Weimar Republic, and finally culminated in the rise of the Nazis.

Within a generation, Germans had grown increasingly self-reliant and sovereign, while intensely nationalistic and chauvinistic. The book sets out an explanation that seems especially topical and urgent now, given subsequent trends in Western politics.

Germans began reimagining the nation and constructed a national identity that only could have emerged through the war and its legacy.

During the war, the Kaiserreich lost legitimacy because of the inability to adequately take care of its citizens. By choosing Hitler, they could displace traditional elites with a dynamic national feeling similar to that of Fritzsche points out that for example Prussian voters were divided into property classes, the highest of which were allocated votes of greater value.

This radical rebelliousness destroyed old authoritarian structures as much as it attacked liberal principles. Perhaps only Germans can answer this, but I feel he is onto something, if only because he provides an explanation for Nazism that does not rely on Germans being a weird, separate species.

Fritzsche has a sharp eye, moreover, for vivid or illuminating details, and he uses them very effectively to weave his narrative Fritzsche gives us an original, new and extremely helpful way to understand how Nazi Germany came into being.

Germans Into Nazis Summary

National Socialism felt more democratic than Weimar, more nationalist than the late monarchy, more activist than traditional organizations.

Why did Germans embrace Hitler? Better than anyone else, the Nazis twisted together ideas from the political Left and Right, crossing nationalism with social reform, anti-Semitism with democracy, fear of the future with hope for a new beginning.

They had recast the nation, but put it on the road to war and genocide. Rejecting the view that Germans voted for the Nazis simply because they hated the Jews, or had been humiliated in World War I, or had been ruined by the Great Depression, Fritzsche makes the controversial argument that Nazism was part of a larger process of democratization and political invigoration that began with the outbreak of World War I.

But one notes that many people in Western countries seem to feel that their sense of identity is threatened, and do not feel that any entity represents them collectively.Summary of Argument in Peter Fritzsches German into Nazis Introduction p.

6: World War I occupies such a prominent place in modern history because it created new social formations organized around a.

Everyone knows that the Germans turned to the Nazis when dismay over the Treaty of Versailles mixed with the depredations of the Great Depression. Fritzsche (Reading Berlin), however, quickly points o. Germans into Nazis by Peter Fritzsche available in Trade Paperback on killarney10mile.com, also read synopsis and reviews.

This work organized around turning points inand explains why the Nazis were so. “ Peter Fritzsche’s Germans into Nazis is an interpretive study of the rise of Nazism which uses the key events of four crisis periods—AugustNovemberJanuary and May —to explain the success of the Nazis in their drive to gain and solidify their power by winning over the German people This book is gracefully.

Germans Into Nazis Summary Peter Fritzsche. Homework Help.

Germans Into Nazis

Germans Into Nazis Author Peter Fritzsche notes that every party denounced Versailles and was somewhat anti-Jewish; moreover, the. In Germans into Nazis, Peter Fritzsche examines four moments in German history between and that exemplify how the Nazi movement became possible.

He looks at the mass crowds of July-August when Germany mobilized at the beginning of .

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Germans into nazis by peter fritzsche
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